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Conference presentation: Senior software developer recruiting and community management

Curious about senior recruiting and communities? Here’s a talk I did at Hirepalooza 2015. Here are the Hirepalooza 2015 slides, which might help, given a couple jumps in the video. This is the description from the talk:

Even if you have a limited budget you still need to recruit tech talent. Join Eric Siegfried, CEO of TangoSource as he talks about how to find and hire the most critical technical talent on your team– even when you have close to no budget. From this session you’ll learn how to build and leverage an ecosystem, relate more to senior talent, and raise the level of your team.

 

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The Scrum retrospective meeting: an introduction.

Some people underestimate sprint retrospective meetings and think of it as simply the time when a sprint ends and they can move on to what’s coming next week. But in reality, this meeting provides an opportunity for the team to identify relevant action items to improve their performance. This is the moment where the team can meet and examine each other’s performance for the sake of the project. It’s also an opportunity to update and improve the team’s definition of done.

There are many ways to lead a retrospective meeting. I’ll share with you what has worked for us.

At the beginning of each meeting

Make the purpose of the meeting clear for everyone. If this is the team’s first retrospective meeting, it’s...

The product owner’s job: to say no.

Have you seen a team that doesn’t understand the reason behind developing certain feature? Have you had a sprint review where more than a half of the features are rejected? Or that the team develops a huge feature that doesn’t add any significant value to the product? If you’ve seen this in your project, it might mean that your Product Owner is doing something wrong.

We can consider the Product Owner to be the main stakeholder. She should own the product and determine direction. The reality is that the Product Owner role is different from that of a project manager, since she has the passion, the vision, and, unlike a project manager, has to say no to people. Let me explain.

Saying NO...

Open sourcing top down zombie game

We’ve been working with Heather Poon to provide open source art for a top down zombie shooter game. It is covered under the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 license

Knowing when to fold ‘em, and the price of success.

For those of you who happen to look at other parts of our site, like the portfolio, you may have curious about our personal productivity tool, Todo Zen. It’s a great example of a viable product that was too slow to the market to make an impact, derailed by the success of an incompatible business. So what happened, and what can you learn from our experience?

Todo Zen origin

After trying out our first product that was getting limited traction in a small market, we realized it was time to move on. My cofounder, Federico, suggested that we try creating a task management tool, and introduced me to Kanban. That evening, we went to a restaurant, and wireframed...

Team extension: How we more than doubled in size yearly, while bootstrapped, since 2009.

Team extension (noun):The service category of helping companies scale their staff with remote contractors who integrate into the current business process.

So where did this term come from? Back in 2009, after a few months of working part time on my first software product, my company announced a voluntary layoff program, due to the excess software engineers in the organization. Within a day, I signed up to sign off. With some self funding, I had an 18 month window to try to find a profitable business after I found a technical co-founder.

During that time period, we killed off one product, started a second, and finally found a working business model, by paying attention to how our business was actually performing....

Finding a technical co-founder: You’re doing it wrong

When you’re trying to create a new product as a non technical person, it might seem easy at first, until you start looking for real technical partners. Either you need to pay more than you can afford, or they simply aren’t interested in what you want. As a potential technical co-founder, there’s often so much work that has to be done before an idea gets validated, it sometimes feels like you’re on your own, with a non technical co-founder just waiting for things to happen.

Creating true partnership is what’s required to if you want to offer your deep gifts to the world. For myself, it took a while to find a real technical partner. Hopefully this post will make...

Coding for a cause: Benefits and Pitfalls

Does free work sound like a bottomless pit of time expenditure, with no chance of compensation? Have you ever wondered how to do pro bono work in a way that not only improves the world but helps out your bottom line? Our team just released some pro bono work for Vittana, which I think was time well spent. Below you can find out how it came about, why it was worthwhile, and read some lessons learned to improve the odds of success for your next pro bono project.

Discovering the project

When I ran into my friend Kenji at a mixer a couple weeks ago, it seemed like a usual incidence of our paths crossing, given that in one...

Finding quality outsourcers, the story of TangoSource

Does your outsourcing experience resemble the image above? A ton of strangers, randomly trying to find work? And after finally choosing someone from the crowd, having to deal with a lack of accountability, poor work product, and lack of passion. I know, I’ve been there, and I’ve learned many lessons. Hopefully my story will help you save time and anguish.

How is all started:

TangoSource’s 1st product was, drumroll, a social network for tango dancers! After the bliss of the first couple of months, I realized that our market wasn’t big enough, so I included ALL social dancers and created DanceHop, an events 2.0 website. I’ve outsourced the design to Yilei Wang and Ruby on Rails development to a local developer,...

SEO keyword research part 2

When you start optimizing for keywords, a few chosen terms will typically be the most that you can focus on at any given time, so it’s super important to be focused on the right terms. In my previous article introducing SEO keyword research I reviewed keyword intent, and how to determine search term value. Now I’ll be going over the process of finding keyword ideas, and determining competition.

Finding keyword ideas

First things first, you’re going to want a plentiful list of keywords to sort through so you can find a few valuable terms to optimize for, as well as low hanging fruit that you can sprinkle into your content. Going back to our original example, helping a friend’s cupcake...